Idocs Guide to HTML

<NOFRAMES>

Usage Recommendation
use it if you use Frames

<NOFRAMES> holds text that should be displayed for people who don't have frames. A large percentage of people on the web don't use browsers which can read frames. You can avoid leaving out those people by using <NOFRAMES>.

<NOFRAMES> should be used in the same document as <FRAMESET ...>. <NOFRAMES> should be inside the outermost <FRAMESET ...> element.

this code produces this
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<TITLE>NOFRAMES example</TITLE>
</HEAD>

<FRAMESET ROWS="15%,*">
     <FRAME SRC="recipetitlebar.html" NAME=TITLE>

     <FRAMESET COLS="20%,*">
          <FRAME SRC="recipesidebar.html" NAME=SIDEBAR>
          <FRAME SRC="recipes.html" NAME=RECIPES>
     </FRAMESET>

<NOFRAMES>
<H1>Great Recipes</H1>
No frames?  No Problem! Take a look at our 
<A HREF="noframesrecipes.html">no-frames</A> 
version.
</NOFRAMES>

</FRAMESET>

</HTML>
this page

Of course, if your browser can do frames, you won't see the content of the <NOFRAMES>, but it looks something like this.

The proposed specifications for HTML 4.0 state that <NOFRAMES> can also go in the <BODY ...> element of a regular page. This allows you to add some content that was originally intended for another frame. Unfortunately, most of the browsers don't recognize this construct, so the content of <NOFRAMES> will be visible to the users.

this code produces this
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<TITLE>Example of NOFRAMES in the BODY</TITLE>
</HEAD>

<BODY>
<NOFRAMES>
<H1>My Home Page</H1>
</NOFRAMES>

regular BODY contents

</BODY>
</HTML>
this set of frames

Copyright 1997-2002 Idocs Inc. Content in this guide is offered freely to the public under the terms of the Open Content License and the Open Publication License. Contents may be redistributed or republished freely under these terms so long as credit to the original creator and contributors is maintained.